Web-Based Course Assessment Tool with Direct Mapping to Student Outcomes

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Research questions about technology use in education in developing countries

let’s investigate this systematically … Back in 2005, I helped put together a ‘quick guide to ICT and education challenges and research questions’ in developing countries. This list was meant to inform a research program at the time sponsored by the World Bank’s infoDev program, but I figured I’d make it public, because the barriers to publishing were so low (copy -> paste -> save -> upload) and in case doing so might be useful to anyone else. While I don’t know to what extent others may have actually found this list helpful, I have seen this document referenced over the years in various funding proposals, and by other funding agencies. Over the past week I’ve (rather surprisingly) heard two separate organizations reference this rather old document in the course of considering some of their research priorities going forward related to investigating possible uses of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to help meet educational goals in low income and middle countries around the world, and so I wondered how these 50 research questions had held up over the years. Are they still relevant? And: What did we miss, ignore or not understand? The list of research questions to be investigated going forward was a sort of companion document to Knowledge maps: What we know (and what we don’t) about ICT use in education in developing countries. It was in many ways a creature of its time and context. The formulation of the research questions identified was in part influenced by some stated interests of the European Commission (which was co-funding some of the work) and I knew that some research questions would resonate with other potential funders at the time (including the World Bank itself) who were interested in related areas (see, for example, the first and last research questions). The list of research questions was thus somewhat idiosynscratic, did not presume to be comprehensive in its treatment of the topic, and was intended meant to imply that certain areas of research interest were ‘more important’ than others not included on the list. That said, in general the list seems to have held up quite well, and many of the research questions from 2005 continue to resonate in 2015. In some ways, this resonance is unfortunate, as it suggests that we still don’t know answers to a lot of very basic questions. Indeed, in some cases we may know as little in 2015 as we knew in 2015, despite the explosion of activity and investment (and rhetoric) in exploring the relevance of technology use in education to help meet a wide variety of challenges faced by education systems, communities, teachers and learners around the world. This is not to imply that we haven’t learned anything, of course (an upcoming EduTech blog post will look at two very useful surveys of research findings that have been published in the past year), but that we still have a long way to go. Some comments and observations, with the benefit of hindsight and when looking forward The full list of research questions from 2005 is copied at the bottom of this blog post (here’s the original list as published, with explanation and commentary on individual items). Reviewing this list, a few things jump out at me:

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